friends · life · Monday Musings · normal · whatever!

Monday musings…

Normal is in the eye of the beholder.
Whoopie Goldberg

Really, what is normal?
Your normal may be outrageous to me.
And what is normal to me may seem weird to you.

I know that that there are people who wonder about me. I am a bit different from most of the folks I know. Oh, I don’t howl at the moon or walk around naked, stand on street corners talking to myself or preaching strange doctrines. I am most often alone doing my thing…whatever that may be at any given time.

I have friends who are extroverts. In fact, most of my close friends are extroverts. They would go crazy if they spent as much time alone as I do. I am an introvert. If I don’t have my alone time I feel crazy anxious. And that ain’t a pretty sight. That’s not to say that there aren’t times when I want and need some time with people. It’s just not everyday.

When I am with the people I love and care about
I know they are normal and they know I am normal.
Our normal ways of being are just different.
Keeps life and friendship interesting.

Photo by Lad Fury on Pexels.com

Black Cat · non-fiction · Tuesday · Uncategorized

Tuesday, I is for introvert…

A Black Cat Book Review

Quiet by Susan Cain

In western culture the extrovert is the person most often celebrated, promoted, sought after, and highly regarded as powerful. The introvert is often over-looked, left behind, ignored, and thought of as weak.The extrovert get things rolling, people moving, and the party going. We know who the extrovert is and what they have to offer because they are the ones talking, often loudly, the center of attention. The introvert is usually on the side-lines, quiet, often alone, and unnoticed.

Because the extroverts are getting the attention and leading the way we think most people are extroverts. But, in fact, almost half of the population are introverts; they are largely passed by because they prefer the shadows to the spotlight.

What makes a person an extrovert or an introvert? Why are our ideas and thoughts about extroverts and introverts so unbalanced? Why is the sensitive quiet one seen as someone “less” than the outgoing life of the party? How can we nurture and encourage children–and adults–who are introverts?

These are some of the questions Cain addresses in Quiet. Her writing style is not purely academic and not difficult for the average person to read. She has done extensive research and study of this subject. She interviewed extroverts and introverts and experts in psychology and neuroscience who study them. Cain gives advise about school choices, careers, relationships, leadership roles and styles and  reasons to sometimes “pretend to be an extrovert”.

Susan Cain’s book, Quiet, is presented clearly and well thought out. It gives reason to celebrate, promote, seek out, and highly regard the power of the introvert. Reading Quiet may change how you think or feel about those who are introverts. And for anyone, like me, who is an introvert it may help you understand who you are and why; and where you fit in.

If you are an introvert, have an introverted child, or are an extrovert who loves an introvert reading this book will be helpful and give you insight and understanding.

This book was sent to me, without charge, by WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group in exchange for this review.